Support Your Fellow Writers

7:00 AM




It feels like lately I've seen a lot of 'Things You Shouldn't Say To A Writer' or 'Things You Should Say To A Writer' or 'How to Support/Care for Writers' type posts. And those are all hilarious, and some of my favorites to read, because they're absolutely true!

It's so important to not say/definitely say certain things to writers, and to know how to approach us. We're, um, special people, after all. A little crazy and a little insecure and all that good stuff. One thing I love about being a writer is how tight-knit the community is, and how much we love and support each other. That being said, I'm going to talk a little bit now about how we as writers should treat our fellow scribbly people!


1. Listen 

This is a super important one. I know it's hard for me, because I'm a chatty person - I'll shove my story and characters and writing thoughts down the throats of anyone who will listen, and it's especially wonderful when I find writerly people who get it. But sometimes it's a good thing to stop talking, sit back, and let the other writer talk about their stuff a little - we're all super passionate about our projects, and that's a good thing, but you shouldn't spend all your conversations talking about your own stuff! Take the time to listen to and appreciate what the other writer has to say. You might just learn something!
I don't even know, I just wanted to use this gif. 


 2. Respect Their Opinions/Stories/Characters/Ideas 

Us writers tend to have very strong opinions. Which is a good thing! We have opinions on what should and shouldn't be written, and the kinds of characters that need to be written more or differently or not as much, and so on. The only trouble comes when you shame other writers for writing things you might not agree with/think are stupid - that's not cool. Just don't do it! You don't have to agree with everything, but you can also just smile and nod and accept their opinions for what it is. 

pirates of the caribbean animated GIF
But we all are, so it's okay. 

3. Fangirl. 

Okay, it sounds silly, but it's totally important. Take the time to listen to those stories and ideas, like I said above, and appreciate them! Really, the best feeling in the world is when someone has a fangirl moment over something you've written. You don't have to fake it, obviously, but you can find something in their writing that excites you/makes you happy/makes you feel things, right? LET THEM KNOW. We're insecure creatures and this is super important.

An accurate representation of fangirling.

4. Give Good Critique (when they ask for it!) 

Don't force critique on people, whatever you do. If they specify that they want help or feedback, give it to them, politely! Good critiques point out not just the awkward bits that don't flow, but the good bits, too. I'm not an expert on this, but there's an excellent Go Teen Writers post here on how to be a good critique partner, so I'll let you check that out. But seriously, we really appreciate when you take the time to look over our work and help us out. 

See? Helpful critique. 

5. Be friendly/interact/comment on blogs/etc

No one likes a writer who just babbles about their own projects and characters. Interact with your fellow writers! Find a bunch of blogs by people like you to comment on and enjoy. Listen. Take the time to read your writerly friends' works. Talk about something other than yourself sometimes. Spread the love! Writers are good at being weird and tight-knit together - help keep it that way! 

Except you should totally invite everyone. 


Now, this isn't an exhaustive list by any means. There are lots of ways us writers can help each other out, but those are the main things that come to my mind right now. So what about you? How do you think writers can help and support and love on each other? Comment away.

29 comments

  1. Writers in the blogosphere are the best, and so encouraging. I agree about the importance of a quality critique when a writer asks for it. I don't have a critique partner yet because none of my manuscripts are polished enough for the eyes of a critique partner, but I think they'll be a very important part of the process.

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    1. They really are <3 Haha, I'm with you there...I've only just started getting critique. BUT. IT IS INVALUABLE. YOU NEED IT. Ahem. Really, though, it's a huge help.

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  2. This is a great post. I, myself, get more out of negative reviews than positive ones, as I am usually able to spot the positive aspects of my book. However, when it comes to spotting the bad, my eyes always seem to gloss over flaws. This is why whenever I have someone else read my work, I never ask, "So what's good? What'd you like?" The first thing I always ask is, "So what do you think needs to be worked on? Were there any parts where you were just completely lost? What didn't you like about it?" I ask these questions first because I have read that agents sometimes look for excuses to reject authors, because of the high level of competition in the market nowadays. Therefore, I assume they pay more attention to the bad than they do the good, so that they can politely pass on the project. Our job as aspiring authors is to minimalize the amount of bad in our books as much as we possibly can, because we literally cannot give agents any reason to say no. Good critique partners are vital, because even though we're sometimes our own biggest critic, we're usually our own biggest fan, too. So we need critique partners who will give it to us straight and let us know ways in which we can improve our writing.

    (I would post you a link to my blog, but it's not nearly as impressive as yours. I am trying though. I'm working on it *wink*)

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    1. I get that! I'm a fan of more brutal critique. I know not everyone is like that, but I enjoy having my darlings ripped apart so I can put them back together again. I really, really like your comment - all of it is absolutely true.

      *runs to find your blog anyway*

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  3. I love the Pirates of the Caribbean gifs, especially the fangirling one!

    This is a great list. And I like that you added fangirling. I've never seen that on a list before. Recently I realized that I always fangirl over someone's project when I love it and they let me critique it or just read it. I had this small doubt that maybe that was bad and unprofessional. But I quickly snuffed it out. I'm a writer, they're writers. They understand the fangirl thing, and if I can't be myself and fangirl over truly good work around writers, then who can I do this around? Besides if it is truly good work, then they deserve the fangirling all the way!

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    1. Thanks! I had fun finding them. xD

      I do the same thing, and that's why I included it. Fangirling (on both ends) is just the best, and I always hope they don't mind.

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  4. YES. This post is great!

    I am surprised everyday how supportive everyone in the blogosphere is. Number 5 is one I learned a while back- I used to just post and not reply to comments. Now that I take the time to interact and enjoy others blogs, I'm much happier- and the circle of blogs I read has extended.

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    1. I know, right? You guys are awesome and I can't believe it sometimes. Really. And that's so true...interacting with other blogs is really a huge boost!

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  5. These are definitely great points, and the only thing I could think of to add, maybe, is to remember that we're not writers 24/7. Sure, it's a great passion of ours and there's very little chance we're going to give it up, but sometimes I feel a lot less of a person and a lot more of a job if the only thing people take the time to get to know about me is that I write sometimes. Be there for me when I want to be a writer, but also give me a break sometimes, and talk to me about Star Trek or cookies or something. I think we'd both feel better.

    Also, you're like the Lord of the GIFs. These are so perfect. And Jack is awesome.

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    1. Yes! Although, I'm the sort of person who rambles on and on and on about my writing and not much else, so I'd be more okay with it xD But that's a good point - we're all people too.

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  6. Love this post! Complete and total awesomeness! Loving the Pirates of the Caribbean GIF's too :P

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    1. Thanks for reading...I'm glad you enjoyed it!

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  7. I totally just wrote a post with all Jack Sparrow gifs. XD *hi fives* GREAT MINDS THINK ALIKE. Also Jack Sparrow *cough* um, I mean CAPTAIN Jack Sparrow is the best.
    I agree with all of these! And definitely YES to 3. I don't think I'd still be writing if no one had ever fangirled over my books. x) It's the most encouraging experience in the world. x)

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    1. Oh my gosh, there is some mindreading going on here xD
      Right? It's helped me HUGELY. Fans (*whispers* minions) are just the very bestest ever.

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  8. Ooh yes I love this! Especially the 3rd one! Fangirling to writers and authors clearly makes their day xD

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    1. Well, yes. Fangirling is fun and encouraging. xD

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  9. Number three is so important. It's always good to know that someone else loves your work. I would've quit writing my book in its early days had it not been for my squealing beta reader. :)

    About the relatable writing blog posts, feel free to check out my blog at http://writershatewriting.wordpress.com for more. :) (Warning: Lots of sarcasm and snark.)

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    1. Apparently it is very important - so many of you have agreed with me on that! It always makes my day, and I totally understand needing it for encouragement. I've gotten way more done with people encouraging me than I would have typing away all alone.

      *runs to check out blog*

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  10. Okay, I thought I commented, but apparently Blogger hates me as much as Facebook. XD

    Anyway. The gif with number three is SO. ACCURATE. Seriously.
    I always feel silly when I fangirl over someone else's writing, but if it were me, I would LOVE it if someone fangirled over my book. So I do it anyway and look like an idiot and hope they appreciate it. (Which, judging by Sarah Clay's comment, she does. ;) (And Sarah, if you read this...JACK! Sorry, I haven't screamed his name in several days, and it needed to come out. XD )

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    1. Yep, the gif is definitely me. xD And I totally get that...it feels silly, but it's wonderful in itself, which I do try to remember. Who cares if you look like an idiot as long as you're having fun? xD Thanks for reading!

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  11. I totally agree with all of the points, and the gifs are hilarious especially "I understand everything ... but the wig." Definitely sandwich critique with comments, and definitely comment, like, and ect. other people's posts. I try to comment on every blog post I read, because I know a comment goes a long way. Who doesn't like comments? Unless they're from some troll, but I'm not opening /that/ can of worms. XD

    Stori Tori's Blog

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    1. I like that gif too...I just had to use it. xD And that's a good way of putting it - sandwiching critique with comments. Definitely true, and good advice to remember!

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  12. Great blog post, Aimee! Everyone can learn from these tips.

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  13. Hilarious post! I agree with all of the above, especially the fangirling thing. When my friends tell me they're fangirling over my work, my little heart just bursts. :D


    Alexa S. Winters
    thessalexa.blogspot.com

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  14. Oh my gosh, I love this post! I'd agree with everything said... not sure if I could add to it. I'll have to think about that. Thanks for sharing this!
    -Andrea

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hey. hey. talk to me. i'm a fan of comments and flailing with you. go for it.